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  • The Freewheeling Fun of Jazz Guitarist Wes Montgomery's Live Concerts

    MoJo Blogs and Articles | Mother Jones
    Jon Young
    25 May 2015 | 1:40 pm
    Wes MontgomeryIn the Beginning Resonance Near the end of his life, jazz guitar virtuoso Wes Montgomery (1923-1968) caught the ear of pop audiences with a series of records that were slick and sophisticated, but a little dull. This vibrant two-disc set is far more satisfying. Spanning 1949 to 1958, In the Beginning is dominated by live performances from Montgomery's hometown of Indianapolis, in small-group settings that often featured brothers Monk (bass) and Buddy (piano), along with underrated tenor sax player Alonzo "Pookie" Johnson. The recordings aren't perfect technically, and the…
  • California Farmers Have Agreed to Water Cuts. What Exactly Does That Mean?

    MoJo Articles | Mother Jones
    Julia Lurie
    22 May 2015 | 2:14 pm
    As California endures its fourth year of grueling drought, officials are getting more serious about mandatory water cuts. Gov. Jerry Brown imposed the state's first-ever water restrictions last month, ordering cities and towns to cut water by 25 percent. But the vast majority of water in California goes not to homes and businesses but to farms, which so far have suffered minimal cuts. On Friday, the state's Water Board approved a deal with farmers in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in which some farmers will voluntarily reduce water use by 25 percent in exchange for…
  • Chart: America Is More Liberal Than Politicians Think

    Kevin Drum Feed | Mother Jones
    Kevin Drum
    24 May 2015 | 8:28 am
    Here's a fascinating tidbit of research. A pair of grad students surveyed 2,000 state legislators and asked them what they thought their constituents believed on several hot button issues. They then compared the results to actual estimates from each district derived from national surveys. The chart on the right is typical of what they found: Everyone—both liberal and conservative legislators—thought their districts were more conservative than they really were. For example, in districts where 60 percent of the constituents supported universal health care, liberal legislators…
  • Kansas Republicans Have Come Up with a Disgraceful New Way to Screw the Poor

    Political Mojo | Mother Jones
    Inae Oh
    22 May 2015 | 9:19 am
    Starting in July, a new law in Kansas will restrict the amount of cash a welfare recipient can take out of ATM's to just $25 a day—a move that critics say introduces a whole new host of financial burdens—including high ATM fees and travel costs—when they access cash. Max Ehrenfreund at the Washington Post explains: Since most banking machines are stocked only with $20 bills, the $25 limit is effectively a $20 limit. A family seeking to withdraw even $200 in cash would have to visit an ATM 10 times a month, a real burden for a parent who might…
  • Obama's Plan to Save the Monarch Butterflies' Epic Migration

    Blue Marble Feed | Mother Jones
    Luke Whelan
    23 May 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Earlier this week, amid negotiating major trade deals and joining Twitter, Obama put forth a major infrastructure project: a highway for monarch butterflies. That's right, monarch butterflies. The pollinators are crucial to the health of our ecosystems but, like bees, their populations have seen startling drops. Some groups are even calling for their protection under the Endangered Species Act. The Obama administration wants to do something about it as part of its strategy to protect pollinating insects, but that turns out to be a tricky task given the monarch's complex life cycle.
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    MoJo Blogs and Articles | Mother Jones

  • The Freewheeling Fun of Jazz Guitarist Wes Montgomery's Live Concerts

    Jon Young
    25 May 2015 | 1:40 pm
    Wes MontgomeryIn the Beginning Resonance Near the end of his life, jazz guitar virtuoso Wes Montgomery (1923-1968) caught the ear of pop audiences with a series of records that were slick and sophisticated, but a little dull. This vibrant two-disc set is far more satisfying. Spanning 1949 to 1958, In the Beginning is dominated by live performances from Montgomery's hometown of Indianapolis, in small-group settings that often featured brothers Monk (bass) and Buddy (piano), along with underrated tenor sax player Alonzo "Pookie" Johnson. The recordings aren't perfect technically, and the…
  • Holy Shit! Almonds Require a Ton of Bees

    Tom Philpott
    25 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Growing 80 percent of the globe's almonds in California doesn't just require massive amounts of water. It also takes a whole bunch of honeybees for pollination—roughly two hives' worth for every acre of almonds trees, around 1.7 million hives altogether. That's at least 80 percent of all available commercial hives in the United States, Gene Brandi, a California beekeeper who serves as vice president of the American Beekeeping Federation, recently told NPR. Now, that vast army of bees—made up, all told, of more than 80 billion flying, buzzing soldiers—doesn't stay…
  • Chart: America Is More Liberal Than Politicians Think

    Kevin Drum
    24 May 2015 | 8:28 am
    Here's a fascinating tidbit of research. A pair of grad students surveyed 2,000 state legislators and asked them what they thought their constituents believed on several hot button issues. They then compared the results to actual estimates from each district derived from national surveys. The chart on the right is typical of what they found: Everyone—both liberal and conservative legislators—thought their districts were more conservative than they really were. For example, in districts where 60 percent of the constituents supported universal health care, liberal legislators…
  • Michael B. Jordan Just Slammed People Who Can’t Deal With One of The Fantastic Four Being Black—And It’s Great

    Edwin Rios
    23 May 2015 | 5:25 pm
    These days, when the fate of the world hangs in the balance, the superheroes that end up saving the day are normally straight, white men—at least on the big screen.  While Marvel's comics have become increasingly more diverse over the years with a half-black, half-Hispanic Spiderman and a female version of Thor, its cinematic universe remains largely male and whitewashed. This is why the backlash to Michael B. Jordan being cast in the highly-anticipated reboot of Fantastic Fouris so disheartening. When the actor was originally confirmed to play Johnny Storm a.k.a the…
  • Obama's Plan to Save the Monarch Butterflies' Epic Migration

    Luke Whelan
    23 May 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Earlier this week, amid negotiating major trade deals and joining Twitter, Obama put forth a major infrastructure project: a highway for monarch butterflies. That's right, monarch butterflies. The pollinators are crucial to the health of our ecosystems but, like bees, their populations have seen startling drops. Some groups are even calling for their protection under the Endangered Species Act. The Obama administration wants to do something about it as part of its strategy to protect pollinating insects, but that turns out to be a tricky task given the monarch's complex life cycle.
 
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    MoJo Articles | Mother Jones

  • California Farmers Have Agreed to Water Cuts. What Exactly Does That Mean?

    Julia Lurie
    22 May 2015 | 2:14 pm
    As California endures its fourth year of grueling drought, officials are getting more serious about mandatory water cuts. Gov. Jerry Brown imposed the state's first-ever water restrictions last month, ordering cities and towns to cut water by 25 percent. But the vast majority of water in California goes not to homes and businesses but to farms, which so far have suffered minimal cuts. On Friday, the state's Water Board approved a deal with farmers in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in which some farmers will voluntarily reduce water use by 25 percent in exchange for…
  • These Are the Jobs Robots Will Take From Humans, According To Researchers With Jobs…For Now

    Dave Gilson
    22 May 2015 | 1:09 pm
    The coming robot invasion is suddenly a hot topic again. This week, Fresh Air interviewed Martin Ford, whose book Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future was just reviewed in the New York Times by Barbara Ehrenreich. The Harvard Business Review published a long article with advice for protecting your career from super-smart robots. And NPR's Planet Money has been producing a series of stories on how machines are getting really good at doing tasks from serving food and writing news articles to reading emotions. As MoJo's Kevin Drum, who's been following this rapidly…
  • These Photos of Sea Creatures Soaked by Oil in California Will Break Your Heart

    Tim McDonnell
    22 May 2015 | 1:00 pm
    Volunteers fill buckets with oil near Refugio State Beach. Michael A. Mariant/AP On Tuesday, an oil pipeline burst near Refugio State Beach west of Santa Barbara, California, sending an estimated 105,000 gallons of oil onto the beach. Up to a fifth of that oil is believed to have reached the ocean, Reuters reports. Now, volunteers and private contractors are racing to clean up the oil. About 6,000 gallons have been collected so far, according to the AP. But damage has already been done. At least two pelicans have been found dead, and five more pelicans and one sea lion were sent for…
  • How Scott Walker and His Allies Hijacked the Wisconsin Supreme Court

    Pema Levy
    22 May 2015 | 5:45 am
    For three years, Wisconsin prosecutors have been investigating whether Republican Gov. Scott Walker broke campaign finance laws as he battled a 2012 recall effort sparked by his push for a law that undercut the power of public-sector unions. Prosecutors allege that Walker and his aides illegally coordinated with conservative groups that were raising money and running ads to support Walker and his Republican allies. At least one group at the center of the probe, the Wisconsin Club for Growth, has gone to court to stop the investigation. Its fate now rests with the Wisconsin Supreme Court,…
  • Does Mike Huckabee Know Where the Ark of the Covenant Is Buried?

    Tim Murphy
    22 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Harry Moskoff wouldn't immediately strike you as the guy to discover the true location of the Ark of the Covenant, the chest that supposedly once held the stone tablets on which the Ten Commandments were written. He was born in Canada, studied jazz at Berklee College of Music, worked in IT, and started a company that specialized in copyright infringement claims when he moved to Tel Aviv 10 years ago. But in his free time, the ordained rabbi has dabbled in biblical archeology, poring over ancient texts and contemporary works, in search of any unturned stone that might help him track down the…
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    Kevin Drum Feed | Mother Jones

  • Chart: America Is More Liberal Than Politicians Think

    Kevin Drum
    24 May 2015 | 8:28 am
    Here's a fascinating tidbit of research. A pair of grad students surveyed 2,000 state legislators and asked them what they thought their constituents believed on several hot button issues. They then compared the results to actual estimates from each district derived from national surveys. The chart on the right is typical of what they found: Everyone—both liberal and conservative legislators—thought their districts were more conservative than they really were. For example, in districts where 60 percent of the constituents supported universal health care, liberal legislators…
  • So How Did My Experiment Turn Out?

    Kevin Drum
    23 May 2015 | 10:42 am
    On Monday I announced that this was Experiment Week. Today is Saturday, and Science™ has spoken. It turns out that I'm kinda sorta OK for about four or five hours in the morning. As long as I rest every hour or so, I can indeed write a couple of light blog posts, take a walk around the block, and shower and shave. That's the good news. However, the deadline for my second walk of the day is about 2 pm. On Monday I walked at 5 pm, and when I was done I felt like I'd just run a marathon. It took me all evening to recover. On Tuesday I walked at 4 pm. This time it felt like I'd run a mile,…
  • Ireland Is Latest Country to Approve Gay Marriage

    Kevin Drum
    23 May 2015 | 8:38 am
    I don't have anything profound to say about this, but it's just a nice piece of good news. And I could use some good news these days: Irish voters have resoundingly backed amending the constitution to legalize gay marriage, leaders on both sides of the Irish referendum declared Saturday after the world’s first national vote on the issue. As the official ballot counting continued, the only question appeared to be how large the “yes” margin of victory from Friday’s vote would be. Analysts said the “yes” support was likely to exceed 60 percent nationally when…
  • For the First Time Ever, Social Conservatives No Longer Outnumber Social Liberals in America

    Kevin Drum
    22 May 2015 | 9:40 am
    Via Ed Kilgore, here's an interesting chart from the good folks at Gallup: What's interesting about this is that the change is due almost entirely to Democrats and Democratic leaners. Since 1999, that group has gone from 35 percent socially liberal to 53 percent, and from 20 percent socially conservative to 14 percent conservative. Republicans and Republican leaners, by contrast, have barely budged. In the 2015 polling there's a slight dip in conservative ID and a slight spike in moderate ID, but it's probably just noise. Generally speaking, the lines are pretty flat over the past couple of…
  • Friday Cat Blogging Counterpoint: I Don't Care About Your Cute Cat

    Ann Friedman
    22 May 2015 | 9:34 am
    While Kevin Drum is focused on getting better, we've invited some remarkable writers, thinkers, and Friends of Kevin to contribute posts and keep the conversation going. Today, in the spirit of open debate, we interrupt our regularly scheduled cat blogging for a counterpoint by writer, editor, podcaster, speaker, chartisan, newsletterer, and former MoJoer Ann Friedman. I don't like cats. And it's even worse than you think: I don't like dogs, either. In fact, I have virtually no interest in animals at all—even eating them. I am really happy that you are comforted by the presence of your…
 
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    Political Mojo | Mother Jones

  • Kansas Republicans Have Come Up with a Disgraceful New Way to Screw the Poor

    Inae Oh
    22 May 2015 | 9:19 am
    Starting in July, a new law in Kansas will restrict the amount of cash a welfare recipient can take out of ATM's to just $25 a day—a move that critics say introduces a whole new host of financial burdens—including high ATM fees and travel costs—when they access cash. Max Ehrenfreund at the Washington Post explains: Since most banking machines are stocked only with $20 bills, the $25 limit is effectively a $20 limit. A family seeking to withdraw even $200 in cash would have to visit an ATM 10 times a month, a real burden for a parent who might…
  • Josh Duggar Resigns From Family Research Council Amid Molestation Allegations

    Edwin Rios
    21 May 2015 | 7:56 pm
    On Thursday, Josh Duggar resigned as head of the Family Research Council's lobbying arm amid allegations from a sealed police report obtained by In Touch Weekly that he sexually molested multiple underage girls when he was a teenager. Duggar, the eldest son of the reality TV family on TLC's 19 and Counting, expressed regret for his actions in a statement on the Duggar family's Facebook page: Twelve years ago, as a young teenager, I acted inexcusably for which I am extremely sorry and deeply regret. I hurt others, including my family and close friends. I confessed this to my parents who took…
  • Could LA's $15 Minimum Wage Sweep the Nation?

    Josh Harkinson
    21 May 2015 | 1:46 pm
    On Tuesday, Los Angeles became the third major West Coast city to pass a $15 minimum wage ordinance. Though the law won't fully go into effect until 2020, it's a huge deal. LA is larger than San Francisco and Seattle, the two other $15-an-hour cities, combined. It also has a much larger contingent of low-wage workers. The ordinance will give a raise to an estimated 750,000 Angelenos, or about 46 percent of the city's workforce. LA's wage hike points to the potential for a major minimum wage boost to sweep the country. Although experts disagree about the LA measure's impact on growth and…
  • Job-Seeker Hillary Clinton Posts Resume on LinkedIn

    Inae Oh
    21 May 2015 | 7:38 am
    Have you heard the news? Hillary Clinton is on the hunt for a new gig. And in an effort to attract prospective employers, the former secretary of state just joined LinkedIn with her very own profile. She even dressed up her page with an article on how to "jump-start small business."  Enjoy the imminent deluge of spammy messages, Hillary! Everyone deserves a distraction from "sensitive but unclassified" emails.
  • Here's What Osama bin Laden Wrote About Climate Change

    Jenna McLaughlin
    20 May 2015 | 9:59 am
    On Wednesday morning, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a trove of newly declassified documents discovered during the 2011 raid on Osama bin Laden's compound. Among the many letters, videos, and audio recordings is an undated document apparently written by bin Laden discussing the "massive consequences" of climate change, a phenomenon he describes as having more victims than wars. The newly released document is very similar in content and language to a recording released in 2010, in which the Al Qaeda leader expounded on climate change and criticized the…
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    Blue Marble Feed | Mother Jones

  • Obama's Plan to Save the Monarch Butterflies' Epic Migration

    Luke Whelan
    23 May 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Earlier this week, amid negotiating major trade deals and joining Twitter, Obama put forth a major infrastructure project: a highway for monarch butterflies. That's right, monarch butterflies. The pollinators are crucial to the health of our ecosystems but, like bees, their populations have seen startling drops. Some groups are even calling for their protection under the Endangered Species Act. The Obama administration wants to do something about it as part of its strategy to protect pollinating insects, but that turns out to be a tricky task given the monarch's complex life cycle.
  • School Lunches Just Got Way Better in These 6 Cities (and It's Not the Food)

    Luke Whelan
    21 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    School lunches may be healthier than when you were a kid, but the wasteful and polluting materials that cafeterias serve them on have actually gotten worse. In an effort to save on labor and equipment costs, many schools switched from washable trays to disposable foam ones over the past couple of decades. But this trend is now beginning to change. The school districts of six major cities—New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, Miami, and Orlando— announced today that they will stop using polystyrene foam trays, and begin serving lunch on compostable plates. The Urban School Food…
  • The 85-Year-Old Nun Who Went to Prison for Embarrassing the Feds Is Finally Free

    Josh Harkinson
    19 May 2015 | 1:17 pm
    Sister Megan Rice, the 85-year-old activist nun who two years ago humiliated government officials by penetrating and vandalizing a supposedly ultra-high-security uranium storage facility, has finally been released from prison. A federal appeals court on Friday overturned the 2013 sabotage convictions of Rice and two fellow anti-nuclear activists, Michael Walli, 66, and Greg Boertje-Obed, 59, ruling that that their actions—breaking into Tennessee's Y-12 National Security Complex and spreading blood on a uranium storage bunker—did not harm national security. Rice's case has become…
  • Kayaktavists Take Over Seattle's Port to Protest Shell Oil's Arctic Drilling Rig

    Luke Whelan
    17 May 2015 | 10:41 am
    This article is being updated as news breaks. See below for the latest. Seattleites took a dramatic stand, er paddle, against Arctic oil drilling on Saturday afternoon. Against the backdrop of the Pacific Northwest city's skyline, around 200 activists, local Native Americans, and concerned citizens took to kayak and canoe and surrounded a giant, Arctic-bound Royal Dutch Shell oil drilling rig currently making a layover in the Port of Seattle. Despite the oil giant's rocky history in the Arctic region, last Monday the Obama administration conditionally approved Shell's summer plans to drill…
  • This Likely GOP Presidential Candidate Actually Believes in Global Warming

    Tim McDonnell
    11 May 2015 | 2:12 pm
    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a potential contender for the Republican presidential nomination, thinks climate change is real and caused—at least in part—by human activity, according to MSNBC. Christie said he believes there's "no use in denying global warming exists" but that he's skeptical about most of the mainstream approaches to dealing with it. That includes cap-and-trade programs and unilateral steps to reduce America's carbon footprint, such as President Barack Obama's proposed restrictions on power plant emissions. Christie's comments essentially matched those he made…
 
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    Politics | Mother Jones

  • Chart: America Is More Liberal Than Politicians Think

    Kevin Drum
    24 May 2015 | 8:28 am
    Here's a fascinating tidbit of research. A pair of grad students surveyed 2,000 state legislators and asked them what they thought their constituents believed on several hot button issues. They then compared the results to actual estimates from each district derived from national surveys. The chart on the right is typical of what they found: Everyone—both liberal and conservative legislators—thought their districts were more conservative than they really were. For example, in districts where 60 percent of the constituents supported universal health care, liberal legislators…
  • These Are the Jobs Robots Will Take From Humans, According To Researchers With Jobs…For Now

    Dave Gilson
    22 May 2015 | 1:09 pm
    The coming robot invasion is suddenly a hot topic again. This week, Fresh Air interviewed Martin Ford, whose book Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future was just reviewed in the New York Times by Barbara Ehrenreich. The Harvard Business Review published a long article with advice for protecting your career from super-smart robots. And NPR's Planet Money has been producing a series of stories on how machines are getting really good at doing tasks from serving food and writing news articles to reading emotions. As MoJo's Kevin Drum, who's been following this rapidly…
  • How Scott Walker and His Allies Hijacked the Wisconsin Supreme Court

    Pema Levy
    22 May 2015 | 5:45 am
    For three years, Wisconsin prosecutors have been investigating whether Republican Gov. Scott Walker broke campaign finance laws as he battled a 2012 recall effort sparked by his push for a law that undercut the power of public-sector unions. Prosecutors allege that Walker and his aides illegally coordinated with conservative groups that were raising money and running ads to support Walker and his Republican allies. At least one group at the center of the probe, the Wisconsin Club for Growth, has gone to court to stop the investigation. Its fate now rests with the Wisconsin Supreme Court,…
  • Does Mike Huckabee Know Where the Ark of the Covenant Is Buried?

    Tim Murphy
    22 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Harry Moskoff wouldn't immediately strike you as the guy to discover the true location of the Ark of the Covenant, the chest that supposedly once held the stone tablets on which the Ten Commandments were written. He was born in Canada, studied jazz at Berklee College of Music, worked in IT, and started a company that specialized in copyright infringement claims when he moved to Tel Aviv 10 years ago. But in his free time, the ordained rabbi has dabbled in biblical archeology, poring over ancient texts and contemporary works, in search of any unturned stone that might help him track down the…
  • Here's the Best Stuff from Edward Snowden's Reddit "Ask Me Anything"

    AJ Vicens
    21 May 2015 | 4:18 pm
    In the midst of the Congressional debate about mass surveillance and a Senate filibuster of a vote on the Patriot Act, it might be easy to forget how we got here. Arguably, none of would be happening if not for Edward Snowden, the erstwhile National Security Agency contractor who rocked the world when he leaked a trove of documents exposing the US government's spying and surveillance operations. Snowden took questions on Reddit during an AMA ("Ask Me Anything") on Thursday. The whole thing is worth a read, but here are some highlights: On Sen. Rand Paul's filibuster of the Patriot Act's…
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    Environment | Mother Jones

  • Obama's Plan to Save the Monarch Butterflies' Epic Migration

    Luke Whelan
    23 May 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Earlier this week, amid negotiating major trade deals and joining Twitter, Obama put forth a major infrastructure project: a highway for monarch butterflies. That's right, monarch butterflies. The pollinators are crucial to the health of our ecosystems but, like bees, their populations have seen startling drops. Some groups are even calling for their protection under the Endangered Species Act. The Obama administration wants to do something about it as part of its strategy to protect pollinating insects, but that turns out to be a tricky task given the monarch's complex life cycle.
  • California Farmers Have Agreed to Water Cuts. What Exactly Does That Mean?

    Julia Lurie
    22 May 2015 | 2:14 pm
    As California endures its fourth year of grueling drought, officials are getting more serious about mandatory water cuts. Gov. Jerry Brown imposed the state's first-ever water restrictions last month, ordering cities and towns to cut water by 25 percent. But the vast majority of water in California goes not to homes and businesses but to farms, which so far have suffered minimal cuts. On Friday, the state's Water Board approved a deal with farmers in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in which some farmers will voluntarily reduce water use by 25 percent in exchange for…
  • These Photos of Sea Creatures Soaked by Oil in California Will Break Your Heart

    Tim McDonnell
    22 May 2015 | 1:00 pm
    Volunteers fill buckets with oil near Refugio State Beach. Michael A. Mariant/AP On Tuesday, an oil pipeline burst near Refugio State Beach west of Santa Barbara, California, sending an estimated 105,000 gallons of oil onto the beach. Up to a fifth of that oil is believed to have reached the ocean, Reuters reports. Now, volunteers and private contractors are racing to clean up the oil. About 6,000 gallons have been collected so far, according to the AP. But damage has already been done. At least two pelicans have been found dead, and five more pelicans and one sea lion were sent for…
  • Exclusive: The CIA Is Shuttering a Secretive Climate Research Program

    Tim McDonnell
    21 May 2015 | 11:44 am
    On Wednesday, when President Barack Obama spoke at the US Coast Guard Academy's commencement ceremony, he called climate change "an immediate risk to our national security." In recent months, the Obama administration has repeatedly highlighted the international threats posed by global warming and has emphasized the need for the country's national security agencies to study and confront the issue. So some national security experts were surprised to learn that an important component of that effort has been ended. A CIA spokesperson confirmed to Climate Desk that the agency is shuttering its…
  • Obama: Climate Deniers in Congress Are Undermining Our Troops

    James West
    20 May 2015 | 11:34 am
    Speaking to graduating cadets at the US Coast Guard Academy on Wednesday, President Obama once again outlined his administration's case for ambitious climate action. At the heart of today's speech: the president's contention that global warming constitutes an immediate threat to America's national security and will cost the country hundreds of billions of dollars if left unchecked. Watch the highlights from the speech above. Obama took direct aim at climate change deniers in Congress. "Denying it—or refusing to deal with it—endangers our national security and undermines the…
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    Culture | Mother Jones

  • Moving Photographs of Japanese American Internees, Then and Now

    Photographs by Paul Kitagaki Jr.
    22 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    In early 1945, the federal government started to open the internment camps where it had held 120,000 Japanese Americans for much of World War II. Seven decades later, photographer Paul Kitagaki Jr. has been tracking down the internees pictured in wartime images by photographers like Dorothea Lange (who photographed Kitagaki's own family—see below). So far, he's identified more than 50 survivors, often reshooting them in the locations where they were originally photographed. Seven-year-olds Helene Nakamoto Mihara (left, in top photo) and Mary Ann Yahiro (center) were photographed by…
  • Taylor Swift: "Misogyny Is Ingrained in People From the Time They Are Born"

    Inae Oh
    19 May 2015 | 6:36 am
    According to this year's "Hot 100" list, an annual inventory in which Maxim's editors meticulously rank famous women by level of attractiveness, Taylor Swift is 2015's reigning queen of female hotness. Rather than use the title to gloat about her declared hotness, Swift used the magazine's cover to call out the double standards women face everyday and the importance of feminism in her life today: From Maxim: Honestly, I didn't have an accurate definition of feminism when I was younger. I didn't quite see all the ways that feminism is vital to growing up in the world we live in. I think that…
  • For Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell, a Strong Round 2

    Jon Young
    18 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Emmylou Harris & Rodney CrowellThe Traveling Kind Nonesuch If only Hollywood sequels were this good. Following Old Yellow Moon, their captivating 2013 collaboration, rootsy stalwarts Emmylou and Rodney have recombined for another go-round, which may be even more entertaining than its predecessor. The two first crossed paths professionally 40 (!) years ago, when Crowell joined Harris’ band. Their recent work together has underscored the virtues of experience and, yes, age. No longer needing to prove anything, both seem as loose and confident as they've ever been, delivering…
  • Blast From the Past: Billy Ward and His Dominoes

    Jon Young
    18 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    Billy Ward and His DominoesThe Complete King/Federal Singles Real Gone Music Superstars on the 1950s R&B scene, Billy Ward's Dominoes launched the careers of two amazing singers: Clyde McPhatter, who later fronted the earliest incarnation of the Drifters on such hits as "Money Honey" and "Such a Night," and Jackie Wilson, whose high-energy solo smashes included "Lonely Teardrops" and "Baby Workout." While this two-disc, 58-track collection is a mixed bag thanks to the corny likes of "Three Coins in the Fountain" and "When the Swallows Come Back to Capistrano," the high points are…
  • That Time Neal Stephenson Blew Up the Moon

    Rebecca Cohen
    15 May 2015 | 3:30 am
    Neal Stephenson's latest novel, Seveneves, could have been titled Goodnight Moon, Forever—the latter blows up in the book's very first sentence. It's not long before a charismatic scientist (who vaguely resembles Neil deGrasse Tyson) realizes the catastrophic implications: Within two years, moon chunks will rain from the sky, obliterating everything on the Earth's surface. Courtesy of Harper Collins Seveneves depicts humanity's effort to get as many people as possible into space before that happens—and everything that follows in the next 5,000 years. Over 867 pages,…
 
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