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  • Remembering James Foley, and the Awful Calculus of a Hostage's Family

    MoJo Blogs and Articles | Mother Jones
    Shane Bauer
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:51 pm
    When I first saw the image of James Foley kneeling before a masked Islamic State member gripping a knife, I wanted to look away, forget, and go for a walk outside. I know the dragging uncertainty of living years and months in the power of someone who sees you as a lever against their enemy. I have a hint of the hot, tingling numbness one feels realizing this could be one's last hour alive. People who have lived through hostage situations know who the survivors are. We don't like to think about the ones who didn't make it while we are here, alive, free and moving on. People who once…
  • Remembering James Foley, and the Awful Calculus of a Hostage's Family

    MoJo Articles | Mother Jones
    Shane Bauer
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:51 pm
    When I first saw the image of James Foley kneeling before a masked Islamic State member gripping a knife, I wanted to look away, forget, and go for a walk outside. I know the dragging uncertainty of living years and months in the power of someone who sees you as a lever against their enemy. I have a hint of the hot, tingling numbness one feels realizing this could be one's last hour alive. People who have lived through hostage situations know who the survivors are. We don't like to think about the ones who didn't make it while we are here, alive, free and moving on. People who once…
  • Housekeeping Note

    Kevin Drum Feed | Mother Jones
    Kevin Drum
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:28 pm
    That's it for the day. I'm off to the hospital for yet another test that will undoubtedly show nothing wrong with me. But you don't know until you look, do you? See you tomorrow.
  • We're Still at War: Photo of the Day for August 20, 2014

    Political Mojo | Mother Jones
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:40 am
    After a training mission, F-15 Eagles of the US Air Force fly over wildland fires in Southern Oregon. (High-G Productions photo by Jim "Hazy" Hazeltine.)
  • How Much It Costs to Raise a Kid, in 4 Charts

    Blue Marble Feed | Mother Jones
    Katie Rose Quandt
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    A middle-income family with a child born in 2013 can expect to spend about a quarter of a million dollars in child-rearing expenses over the next 18 years, according to a new report from the USDA. Costs such as housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, child care, and education will amount to an expected $304,340 ($245,340 in 2013 dollars) for middle-income families, a 1.8 percent increase from last year's report. For each income bracket, costs will increase as the child ages: Although households with incomes in the lowest third will spend less than half as much on child-related…
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    MoJo Blogs and Articles | Mother Jones

  • Remembering James Foley, and the Awful Calculus of a Hostage's Family

    Shane Bauer
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:51 pm
    When I first saw the image of James Foley kneeling before a masked Islamic State member gripping a knife, I wanted to look away, forget, and go for a walk outside. I know the dragging uncertainty of living years and months in the power of someone who sees you as a lever against their enemy. I have a hint of the hot, tingling numbness one feels realizing this could be one's last hour alive. People who have lived through hostage situations know who the survivors are. We don't like to think about the ones who didn't make it while we are here, alive, free and moving on. People who once…
  • Housekeeping Note

    Kevin Drum
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:28 pm
    That's it for the day. I'm off to the hospital for yet another test that will undoubtedly show nothing wrong with me. But you don't know until you look, do you? See you tomorrow.
  • Do Liberals Rely Too Much on Guilt?

    Kevin Drum
    20 Aug 2014 | 11:05 am
    Tim F. makes an observation: Spend some time following internet conversations about your liberal cause of the day (global warming, racial injustice, etc) and eventually someone will get to the nut of why the issue pisses many people off: they think activists want them to feel guilty and they don’t want to feel guilty. That’s pretty much it. A huge part of our failure to do anything about the climate disaster or racist asshole cops comes from people protecting their delicate ego. Yep. But I'd take this a little more seriously, because it's probably something that genuinely hurts…
  • We're Still at War: Photo of the Day for August 20, 2014

    20 Aug 2014 | 10:40 am
    After a training mission, F-15 Eagles of the US Air Force fly over wildland fires in Southern Oregon. (High-G Productions photo by Jim "Hazy" Hazeltine.)
  • From Anarchists to Tibetan Monks, Here Are Some of the Outsiders Joining Protests in Ferguson

    Josh Harkinson
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    "Crisis is the leading edge where change is possible," Lisa Fithian, an itinerant protest organizer, once told me. Nowhere does that seem more true right now than in Ferguson, Missouri, where ongoing protests have drawn attention to a deep national vein of racial animus. It's not surprising, then, that national figures have begun parachuting into town: the Reverends Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, actress Keke Palmer, Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey—and the list goes on. The threat of "outside agitators" is a meme that has accompanied protests dating back to the civil rights era and…
 
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    MoJo Articles | Mother Jones

  • Remembering James Foley, and the Awful Calculus of a Hostage's Family

    Shane Bauer
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:51 pm
    When I first saw the image of James Foley kneeling before a masked Islamic State member gripping a knife, I wanted to look away, forget, and go for a walk outside. I know the dragging uncertainty of living years and months in the power of someone who sees you as a lever against their enemy. I have a hint of the hot, tingling numbness one feels realizing this could be one's last hour alive. People who have lived through hostage situations know who the survivors are. We don't like to think about the ones who didn't make it while we are here, alive, free and moving on. People who once…
  • From Anarchists to Tibetan Monks, Here Are Some of the Outsiders Joining Protests in Ferguson

    Josh Harkinson
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    "Crisis is the leading edge where change is possible," Lisa Fithian, an itinerant protest organizer, once told me. Nowhere does that seem more true right now than in Ferguson, Missouri, where ongoing protests have drawn attention to a deep national vein of racial animus. It's not surprising, then, that national figures have begun parachuting into town: the Reverends Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, actress Keke Palmer, Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey—and the list goes on. The threat of "outside agitators" is a meme that has accompanied protests dating back to the civil rights era and…
  • US Sent Thousands of Sailors to Help With Fukushima. Did Radiation Make Them Sick?

    Suzanne Goldenberg and James West
    20 Aug 2014 | 8:37 am
    This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The article was reported by the Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg, and the video was produced by Climate Desk's James West. The first time it occurred to James Jackson that there could be lasting damage from his US Navy service during Japan's tsunami and nuclear disaster came when his eldest son, Darius, was diagnosed with leukemia. Darius, now 15, spent a month in hospital in early 2013, soon after his diagnosis. "I thought I was going to have to bury him," Jackson…
  • Voter Registration Drives in Ferguson Are "Disgusting," Says Missouri GOP Leader

    Tasneem Raja
    20 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Over the last couple days, voter registration booths have been popping up in Ferguson. There was one by the ruined site of the recently burned-down QuikTrip convenience store, which has become a central gathering site of the protests, and another near the site where Michael Brown was shot. Voter turnout was just 12 percent in Ferguson's last municipal election, and in a city that's 60 percent black, virtually all city officials are white. In December, the black superintendent of the Ferguson-Florissant school district was fired by the then all-white school board, and the longtime St.
  • Now Your Food Has Fake DNA in It

    Tom Philpott
    20 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Like many novel technologies in this age of TED Talks and Silicon Valley triumphalism, synthetic biology—synbio for short—floats on a sea of hype. One of its founding scientists, Boston University biomedical engineer James Collins, has called it "genetic engineering on steroids." Whereas garden-variety genetic engineers busy themselves moving genes from one organism into another—to create tomatoes that don't bruise easily, for example—synthetic biologists generate new DNA sequences the way programmers write code, creating new life-forms. It may sound like science…
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    Kevin Drum Feed | Mother Jones

  • Housekeeping Note

    Kevin Drum
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:28 pm
    That's it for the day. I'm off to the hospital for yet another test that will undoubtedly show nothing wrong with me. But you don't know until you look, do you? See you tomorrow.
  • Do Liberals Rely Too Much on Guilt?

    Kevin Drum
    20 Aug 2014 | 11:05 am
    Tim F. makes an observation: Spend some time following internet conversations about your liberal cause of the day (global warming, racial injustice, etc) and eventually someone will get to the nut of why the issue pisses many people off: they think activists want them to feel guilty and they don’t want to feel guilty. That’s pretty much it. A huge part of our failure to do anything about the climate disaster or racist asshole cops comes from people protecting their delicate ego. Yep. But I'd take this a little more seriously, because it's probably something that genuinely hurts…
  • Let Us Now Psychoanalyze Famous Men (And Their Photographs)

    Kevin Drum
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:12 am
    Bob Somerby calls my attention to the following bit of psychobabble from Peter Baker and Matt Apuzzo of the New York Times. The subject is a photo released by the White House: Mr. Holder, 63, is the one leaning forward, both in the photograph released by the White House and on the issues underlying the crisis in Ferguson, Mo. A child of the civil rights era, he grew up shaped by the images of violence in Selma, Ala., and joined sit-ins at Columbia University where protesters renamed an office after Malcolm X. Now in high office, he pushes for policy changes and is to fly on Wednesday to…
  • Barack Obama Loathes Congress as Much as You Do

    Kevin Drum
    20 Aug 2014 | 7:56 am
    Ezra Klein responds to a New York Times article about President Obama's chilly relationship with his fellow Democrats: Obama does see socializing with Hill Democrats as a chore. But there's a lot that Obama sees as a chore and commits to anyway. The presidency, for all its power, is full of drudgery; there are ambassadors to swear in and fundraisers to attend and endless briefings on issues that the briefers don't even really care about. The reason Obama doesn't put more effort into stroking congressional Democrats is he sees it as a useless chore. The Times article...never names a bill that…
  • What's in a Word: Trophy vs. Ribbon Edition

    Kevin Drum
    20 Aug 2014 | 7:20 am
    A recent poll from Reason magazine investigates the burning question of whether kids on sports teams should all get participation trophies, or whether it should only be the winners. Overall, 57 percent think only the winners should get trophies, but the detailed breakdown is kind of interesting. It turns out that society's winners generally think that only winners should get trophies. Society's also-rans tend to think everyone should be recognized. I wonder how much of this has to do with the word trophy? For many decades, after all, the US military has awarded ribbons to anyone who…
 
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    Political Mojo | Mother Jones

  • We're Still at War: Photo of the Day for August 20, 2014

    20 Aug 2014 | 10:40 am
    After a training mission, F-15 Eagles of the US Air Force fly over wildland fires in Southern Oregon. (High-G Productions photo by Jim "Hazy" Hazeltine.)
  • Watch: Livestream from Ferguson: August 19

    AJ Vicens
    19 Aug 2014 | 10:21 pm
    The live stream feed via Vice News and Tim Pool was largely mellow for most of the night, Aug. 19, until about 11: 50 p.m. CDT, when a thrown bottle led to police moving in. You can see the whole thing, as it happened, embedded below. 12:04 p.m. CDT: Ryan Devereaux of The Intercept tweeted a picture of peacemakers trying to calm down a potentially violent moment: Community members link hands to separate police from the crowd pic.twitter.com/CxOoM9GSxo — Ryan Devereaux (@rdevro) August 20, 2014 12:15 p.m. CDT:Wesley Lowery tweets a picture of police forming a line against the press:…
  • This Is Rick Perry's Mugshot

    Ben Dreyfuss
    19 Aug 2014 | 4:02 pm
    Rick Perry was booked today on abuse of power charges that look pretty flimsy. Say what you will about his awful retrograde conservative politics, but Rick Perry is a handsome devil. #BREAKING @GovernorPerry booking photo just released http://t.co/EQmoHi2lm3 pic.twitter.com/QSI2E0vKLy — NBC DFW (@NBCDFW) August 19, 2014
  • Amnesty International's Latest Hot Spot? Ferguson.

    Sam Brodey
    19 Aug 2014 | 2:06 pm
    Amnesty International is best known for monitoring human rights conditions in places like Afghanistan and China—while active in the United States, it rarely makes headlines here. That's why the sight of yellow-clad Amnesty activists walking the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, is attracting so much attention: It marks the first time an Amnesty delegation has been dispatched to monitor a human rights crisis unfolding on American soil. Margaret Huang, deputy executive director of campaigns and programs for Amnesty USA, was in Ferguson earlier this week for what she called a "support…
  • The Man Who Ran Contra Propaganda for Reagan Is Guatemala’s New DC Lobbyist

    Ian Gordon
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:45 am
    In late July, with child migrants still surging across the US-Mexico border, President Obama met with Central American leaders to discuss a response to the crisis. Not satisfied with Obama's plans, Guatemalan president Otto Pérez Molina took his agenda to the media, writing a Guardian op-ed criticizing the United States for the lasting legacy of both the Cold War and the drug war in his country. Around the same time, Guatemala hired a lobbyist to help push its interests in Washington, DC. Given Pérez Molina's sharp criticism of the United States' history in the region, his…
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    Blue Marble Feed | Mother Jones

  • How Much It Costs to Raise a Kid, in 4 Charts

    Katie Rose Quandt
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    A middle-income family with a child born in 2013 can expect to spend about a quarter of a million dollars in child-rearing expenses over the next 18 years, according to a new report from the USDA. Costs such as housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, child care, and education will amount to an expected $304,340 ($245,340 in 2013 dollars) for middle-income families, a 1.8 percent increase from last year's report. For each income bracket, costs will increase as the child ages: Although households with incomes in the lowest third will spend less than half as much on child-related…
  • Are Your Kids' Rainbow Bracelets Toxic?

    Kiera Butler
    12 Aug 2014 | 10:35 am
    Bracelets and other trinkets made on the wildly popular Rainbow Loom—a toy that allows kids to weave together brightly colored elastic bands—could contain cancer-causing chemicals, a British laboratory has found. In a study commissioned by a British toy retailer, the Assay Laboratory in Birmingham, United Kingdom, tested charms meant to be attached to bracelets and necklaces woven on the looms. The researchers found that while Rainbow Loom's own name-brand products were safe, some charms made by knockoff brands contained high levels of phthalates, a class of carcinogenic…
  • Video: "Holy Shit!" Freak Weather Event Stuns Brooklyn's Hipster Beach

    James West
    10 Aug 2014 | 2:12 pm
    The weekend peace and quiet of McCarren Park in Brooklyn, New York—sometimes dubbed the "hipster beach" by locals—was shattered on Sunday afternoon​ by a strange, towering meteorological visitor. And also by the howls of my friend Michael Gambale, who took this video, yelling like the world was fast coming to an end. "It was amazing," he said. "I had my 'oh shit, a double rainbow' moment."​ The spiraling, orange tunnel-like phenomenon appears to be a textbook specimen of a "dust devil", which…
  • Shorter Trees Could Make Peaches Cheaper

    Rebecca Cohen
    8 Aug 2014 | 4:18 pm
    When it comes to peach and nectarine trees, bigger isn't necessarily better. An orchard worker can spend as much as half of his or her day lugging around the ladders required to reach the branches of a typical 13-foot tree. Plus, the danger of climbing the ladders drives up the cost of workers' compensation insurance—growers of peaches and nectarines pay about 40 percent more for it than growers of low-lying fruit like grapes. Now scientists at the University of California are trying to shrink the cost of labor on peach and nectarine farms by shrinking the plants themselves. In a 4-acre…
  • Humans Have Tripled Mercury in the Oceans

    Jenna McLaughlin
    8 Aug 2014 | 10:23 am
    On Thursday, researchers released the first comprehensive study of mercury in the world's oceans over time according to depth. Their finding: Since the Industrial Revolution, the burning of fossil fuels and some mining activities have resulted in a more than three times increase in mercury in the upper 100 meters (about 330 feet) of the ocean. There, it builds up in carnivorous species like tuna—a food staple in the US that health experts have been concerned about for years because of its high mercury levels. Much of the 290 million moles (a unit of measure for…
 
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    Politics | Mother Jones

  • Remembering James Foley, and the Awful Calculus of a Hostage's Family

    Shane Bauer
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:51 pm
    When I first saw the image of James Foley kneeling before a masked Islamic State member gripping a knife, I wanted to look away, forget, and go for a walk outside. I know the dragging uncertainty of living years and months in the power of someone who sees you as a lever against their enemy. I have a hint of the hot, tingling numbness one feels realizing this could be one's last hour alive. People who have lived through hostage situations know who the survivors are. We don't like to think about the ones who didn't make it while we are here, alive, free and moving on. People who once…
  • From Anarchists to Tibetan Monks, Here Are Some of the Outsiders Joining Protests in Ferguson

    Josh Harkinson
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    "Crisis is the leading edge where change is possible," Lisa Fithian, an itinerant protest organizer, once told me. Nowhere does that seem more true right now than in Ferguson, Missouri, where ongoing protests have drawn attention to a deep national vein of racial animus. It's not surprising, then, that national figures have begun parachuting into town: the Reverends Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, actress Keke Palmer, Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey—and the list goes on. The threat of "outside agitators" is a meme that has accompanied protests dating back to the civil rights era and…
  • Voter Registration Drives in Ferguson Are "Disgusting," Says Missouri GOP Leader

    Tasneem Raja
    20 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Over the last couple days, voter registration booths have been popping up in Ferguson. There was one by the ruined site of the recently burned-down QuikTrip convenience store, which has become a central gathering site of the protests, and another near the site where Michael Brown was shot. Voter turnout was just 12 percent in Ferguson's last municipal election, and in a city that's 60 percent black, virtually all city officials are white. In December, the black superintendent of the Ferguson-Florissant school district was fired by the then all-white school board, and the longtime St.
  • GOP Candidate Asks Residents to Mail Him Their Pee

    Tim Murphy
    20 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    In the run-up to this fall's rematch against Rep. Pete DeFazio (D-Ore.), Republican Art Robinson is making an unusual ask. "My name is Art Robinson," read one of the mailers he sent to 500,000 Oregon residents in March. "I am a scientist who has lived and worked in Josephine County for 34 years. My colleagues and I are developing improved methods for the measurement of human health. Please consider giving us a sample of your urine." Robinson is a scientist, and that's part of the problem. For the last three decades, when he's not running for office, the Caltech-educated chemist has run a…
  • Here's What Happens to Police Officers Who Shoot Unarmed Black Men

    Jaeah Lee and Katie Rose Quandt
    20 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    In the week since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, initial autopsy findings, police reports, and eyewitness accounts have begun to provide some insights into the circumstances of his death. But plenty of questions remain unanswered, not the least of them: Where is Officer Darren Wilson, and what's likely to happen to him? Wilson, who was put on administrative leave after killing Brown, reportedly left home with his family a few days before his name was made public. A fundraising campaign launched on August 17 has already raised more than…
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    Environment | Mother Jones

  • US Sent Thousands of Sailors to Help With Fukushima. Did Radiation Make Them Sick?

    Suzanne Goldenberg and James West
    20 Aug 2014 | 8:37 am
    This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The article was reported by the Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg, and the video was produced by Climate Desk's James West. The first time it occurred to James Jackson that there could be lasting damage from his US Navy service during Japan's tsunami and nuclear disaster came when his eldest son, Darius, was diagnosed with leukemia. Darius, now 15, spent a month in hospital in early 2013, soon after his diagnosis. "I thought I was going to have to bury him," Jackson…
  • Now Your Food Has Fake DNA in It

    Tom Philpott
    20 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Like many novel technologies in this age of TED Talks and Silicon Valley triumphalism, synthetic biology—synbio for short—floats on a sea of hype. One of its founding scientists, Boston University biomedical engineer James Collins, has called it "genetic engineering on steroids." Whereas garden-variety genetic engineers busy themselves moving genes from one organism into another—to create tomatoes that don't bruise easily, for example—synthetic biologists generate new DNA sequences the way programmers write code, creating new life-forms. It may sound like science…
  • Should We Regulate Poop As a Drug?

    Alex Park
    18 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    In 2011, Mark Smith was working on a Ph.D. in microbiology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when his friend's cousin—we'll call him Steve—was diagnosed with C. difficile. Known by the shorthand C. diff, it is now the most common hospital-acquired bacterial infection, and, as the name implies, it's difficult to treat. Patients have near-constant severe diarrhea and bleeding from the bowels that can last for months, or even years. Many sufferers can't hold a job because they're housebound. Continue Reading »
  • Why the Scientific Case Against Fracking Keeps Getting Stronger

    Chris Mooney
    15 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    On the political right, it's pretty popular these days to claim that the left exaggerates scientific worries about hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking." In a recent National Review article, for instance, a Hoover Institution researcher complains that 53 percent of Democrats in California support a fracking ban "despite the existence of little if any credible scientific evidence of fracking's feared harms and overwhelming scientific evidence of its environmental benefits, including substantial reductions in both local and global pollutants." Three or four years ago, a statement like that may…
  • Warning: This Video Will Make You Want to Do Something to Save the Oceans

    Chris Mooney
    15 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Early on in the new Netflix documentary "Mission Blue" (preview here), a voice off camera asks Sylvia Earle—ocean explorer, scientist, conservationist, and the film's main character—if she's a "radical." "If I seem like a radical," Earle answers slowly, "it may be because I see things that others do not." Unlike 99.9 percent of us, Earle actually gets to say stuff like that. As a woman who has spent almost a year of her life underwater, she really has witnessed things that we cannot imagine. Unfortunately, that includes not only the awe of swimming with a pack of whale sharks in…
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    Culture | Mother Jones

  • Mo'ne Davis Is the First Little Leaguer to Make the Cover of Sports Illustrated

    Katie Rose Quandt
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:20 pm
    Thirteen-year-old pitching sensation Mo'ne Davis just became the first Little Leaguer ever on the cover of Sports Illustrated. Remember Her Name! #LLWS2014 sensation @Monedavis11 is on this week's national cover http://t.co/LAwVgubpCS pic.twitter.com/sENsPMF7ew — Sports Illustrated (@SInow) August 19, 2014 Davis, who pitches for South Philadelphia's Taney Dragons, received national attention last week when she threw a two-hit shutout and struck out eight in the Dragons' Little League World Series opening victory over Nashville, Tennessee. On Sunday she became the sixth girl to…
  • Stalin, Castro, Barbie: An Excerpt From Eduardo Galeano's Latest Book, "Mirrors"

    Eduardo Galeano
    18 Aug 2014 | 2:55 pm
    This story first appeared on the TomDispatch website. The following passages are excerpted from Eduardo Galeano's history of humanity, Mirrors (Nation Books). Stalin He learned to write in the language of Georgia, his homeland, but in the seminary the monks made him speak Russian. Years later in Moscow, his south Caucasus accent still gave him away. So he decided to become more Russian than the Russians. Was not Napoleon, who hailed from Corsica, more French than the French? And was not Catherine the Great, who was German, more Russian than the Russians? The Georgian, Iosif Dzhugashvili,…
  • When Did Music Festivals Turn Into Shopping Fests?

    Sam Brodey and Prashanth Kamalakanthan
    18 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Music festivals these days offer far more than music: When attendees step on the grounds, they're a captive audience (fish in a barrel?) for all manner of food, drink, goods, and services. They're also automatic eyeballs for companies that shell out big bucks for the chance to provide "branded experiences." There's a growing feeling that the "music" part of the megafests is starting to take a backseat to the array of other experiences. At Coachella, you've got dodge ball, relay races, and the famed ferris wheel. At Bonnaroo, you can supplement your music with yoga, a movie theater, and a 5k…
  • Devo's "The Men Who Make the Music" is Hilarious and Unsettling

    Jon Young
    18 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    DevoThe Men Who Make the Music plus Butch Devo and the Sundance Gig MVD Visual Best known, perhaps, for the giddy 1980 smash, "Whip It," Devo was much more than the disposable New Wave novelty act that hit implied, as this enticing DVD proves. Mixing high concepts and low humor, the Ohio-bred band specialized in raucous punk-electronica drenched in pessimism and misanthropy, and delivered the goods with an irresistible, wild-eyed spirit, attracting support from the likes of David Bowie and Neil Young. The Men Who Make the Music draws primarily from Devo's groundbreaking '70s work, with…
  • The Latest Court Case Didn’t End the NCAA As We Know It. The Next One Might.

    Sam Brodey
    13 Aug 2014 | 1:50 pm
    On Friday, a federal judge made college sports history when she ruled that the NCAA could not deny players from profiting from the use of their likenesses on TV or in video games. In doing so, Judge Claudia Wilken laid down two rules: (1) Schools can put up to $5,000 a year in a trust for athletes; and (2) they can offer more comprehensive scholarships that cover the full cost of attending college. Many NCAA watchers have argued that the ruling in O'Bannon v. NCAA doesn't change much, contrary to what some thought a year ago. For example, schools in the rich, successful power conferences…
 
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